What can the G20 do to improve social cohesion and trigger responsibility in business and politics?

In the context of recent dynamics propelled by globalization and technological developments, the trust in political institutions has diminished in many parts of the world and led to a surge of parties selfportraying as anti-establishment, often promoting nativism and xenophobia. This trend undermines the support for multilateralism and effective global governance and propagates the idea that relationships between nation states are a zero-sum-game. To revitalise multilateralism and global solidarity, the benefits of globalization and international cooperation must be made more visible and more accessible to the general public. The purpose of the session is to discuss the foundations of a social cohesion at the global level; and what the G20 can do to foster social cohesion from the local to the global level. Social cohesion is the capacity of a community to express mutual solidarity and traditionally, social cohesion is considered to be rooted primarily at the national level. How widespread is the notion of global citizenship, and to what extent is it compatible with other notions of citizenship? Could policies such as a global health fund or a global basic income and increased international cooperation on tax matters buttress the idea of global citizenship? How can businesses foster and valorize global citizenship and global solidarity?

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Keynote

Panel Discussion

Speakers

Keynote

Paul Collier

University of Oxford

Panel

Gianluca Grimalda

Kiel Institute for the World Economy

Colm Kelly        

Global Tax & Legal Services Leader and Global Purpose Leader, PwC

Claudia Sanhueza

Universidad Mayor, Chile

Moderator: Marc Fleurbaey
Princeton University, USA
Global Solutions Fellow

Voices of the 2020 Young Global Changers

Ninety young people from around the world were selected to participate in the 2020 Global Solutions Summit as Young Global Changers. These young changemakers from academica, business and civil society contribute and debate in their various working groups on the Summit topics. Watch the video with statements and questions by the YGC Working Group on Social Cohesion and the State!

The Young Global Changers regularly contribute to the Young Global Changers blog. Browse through the YGC blog and read more articles on society and related topics, written by the Young Global Changers’ community.

Policy Recommendations, Policy Briefs and Articles

Policy Briefs on Social Cohesion and the State

Policy Briefs contain recommendations and visions and cover policy ares that are of interest to G20 policymakers. The majority of the Policy Briefs has been developed by a corresponding T20 Task Force.

T20 Recommendations Report: Social Cohesion and the State

Compiled by Dennis Görlich (IfW Kiel) and Juliane Stein-Zalai (IfW Kiel)

Recoupling Economic and Social Progress

By Katharina Lima de Miranda (IfW) and Dennis J. Snower (Global Solutions Initiative)

The COVID-19 Pandemic: Government vs. Community Action Across the United States

By Adam Brzezinski, Guido Deiana, Valentin Kecht and David Van Dijcke (University of Oxford – The Institute for New Economic Thinking)

Will COVID-19 Remake the World?

By Dani Rodrik (Harvard University – Kennedy School of Government)

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Birgit Hansen Förde-vhs, Kiel (Germany)

The questions are: Does more equality lead to better social cohesian ? Which strategies are needed for better social cohesion ? There is not only economic inequality. For example migrants/refugees: It often takes years until migrants/refugees get the citizenship of their (new) country . However , as long as they neither have the right to vote nor are eligible to for election at their (new) place of residence they are excluded from important political decision making processes. In that respect there is no equality between migrants/refugees and the majority of people in the country they live in. The migrants/refugees active… Read more »

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